Articles

Learning Multiple Things Simultaneously Increases Cognitive Abilities

Learning several new things at once increases cognitive abilities in older adults, according to new research. After just 1.5 months learning multiple tasks in a new study, participants increased their cognitive abilities to levels similar to those of middle-aged adults, 30 years younger. Control group members, who did not take classes, showed no change in their performance.

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The Brain’s Auto-complete Function. New Insights into Associative Memory

When looking at a picture of a sunny day at the beach, we can almost smell the scent of sun screen. Our brain often completes memories and automatically brings back to mind the different elements of the original experience. A new study now reveals the underlying mechanisms of this auto-complete function.

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Study: Cognitive Skills and their Impact on Academic Achievement

Edublox Online Tutor provides a free online assessment to measure a number of cognitive skills, specifically visual sequential memory, auditory memory, iconic memory and logical reasoning. Sixty-four Grade 2 students of an inner-city school took the test after which their test scores were correlated with their academic grades using the Pearson Correlation.

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Cognitive Skills: What They Are and Why They Are Important

The word “cognition” is defined as “the act or process of knowing”. Cognitive skills therefore refer to those skills that make it possible for us to know. They have more to do with the mechanisms of how we learn, rather than with any actual knowledge. Cognitive skills include perception, attention, memory and logical reasoning.

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Research on Auditory Memory: The Overlooked Learning Skill Deficiency

Sixty-four Grade 2 students were randomly divided into three groups: the first group completed 28 hours of Edublox's Development Tutor over three weeks; a second group was exposed to standard computer games, while a third group continued with schoolwork...

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Processing Speed: Definition, Importance, Research, Overcoming Deficits

Some kids are naturally fast. They run, talk, complete homework assignments and do all sorts of things at a rate that seems appropriate for their age. Other kids don’t, or, perhaps it would be fairer to say they can’t. These are kids who may have what are known as processing speed deficits. 

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Learning about Mnemonics: What Is an Acronym?

An acronym is a word that is made up by taking the first letter from each word that you want to remember and making a new word from all those letters. For example, if you want to remember the names of the Great Lakes, you could learn the acronym HOMES — Huron, Ontario, Michigan, Erie, Superior.

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Study: Checking Phones in Lectures Can Cost Students 5% in Exams

Students perform less well in end-of-term exams if they are allowed access to an electronic device, such as a phone or tablet, for non-academic purposes in lectures, a new study in Educational Psychology finds.

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Types of Memory: Visual, Auditory, Sensory, Working, Short- & Long-term

Scientists now know that memory actually takes many different forms. Memory is not an “all-or-none” process; it is clear that there are actually many kinds of memory, each of which may be somewhat independent of the others. Here are a few...

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Working Memory: Definition, Importance, Research, Overcoming Deficits

Working memory is the ability to hold information in your head and manipulate it mentally. To solve an arithmetic problem like (3 X 3) + (4 X 2) in your head, for example, you need to keep the intermediate results in mind (i.e., 3 X 3 = 9) to be able to solve the entire problem. The distinction between short-term memory and working memory is an ongoing debate, as the terms are often used interchangeably. 

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Short-Term Memory: Definition, Facts, Studies, Test, Overcoming Deficits

If you have looked up a telephone number in a directory, you already know a great deal about short-term memory. You repeat the number to yourself until you dial, and then you forget it. If the number is busy, you may have to look it up again.

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Sequential Memory: Definition, Importance, Overcoming Deficits

Sequential memory requires items to be recalled in a specific order. In saying the days of the week, months of the year, a telephone number, the alphabet, and in counting, the order of the elements is of paramount importance.

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