Articles

Fact or Fiction? Dyslexia Is a Myth

Extreme viewpoints exist about dyslexia, which makes it difficult for parents to know how to best help their child. On the one side there is the group who believe dyslexia is a condition that cannot be cured but endured. On the other extreme there are those who say diagnoses of dyslexia are a complete waste of time — and even that dyslexia is a myth.

Read more...

Speech Recognition Technology Is Not a Solution for Poor Readers

Could artificial intelligence be a solution for people who cannot read well (functional illiterates) or those who cannot read at all (complete illiterates)? According to psycholinguists, speech technology should never replace learning how to read. Researchers argue that literacy leads to a better understanding of speech because good readers are good at predicting words. Even […]

Read more...

Case Study: Overcoming Severe Dyslexia, Dyscalculia and Low IQ

Meet Maddie, a 10-year-old who had been diagnosed with severe dyslexia, moderate dyscalculia, ADHD, and low IQ (low 80s). People who had evaluated her said that they had never seen dyslexia as severe as this before. Her parents had been told by more than one professional that Maddie would probably never read, and that they should try to find things that Maddie could be successful with outside of academics, because she would never be successful in academics...

Read more...

A Brief History of Dyslexia: From Berlin to Orton

The term dyslexia was introduced in 1884 by the German ophthalmologist, Rudolf Berlin, in “Over dyslexie.” He coined it from the Greek words "dys" meaning ill or difficult and "lexis" meaning word, and used it to describe a specific disturbance of reading in the absence of pathological conditions in the visual organs.

Read more...

Dyslexia: More than a Phonological Deficit

Most problems can only be solved if one knows what causes that particular problem. A disease such as scurvy claimed the lives of thousands of seamen during long sea voyages. The disease was cured fairly quickly once the cause was discovered, viz. a vitamin C deficiency. A viable point of departure would therefore be to ask the question, what causes dyslexia?

Read more...

What Are the Different Types of Dyslexia?

The terms phonological dyslexia and surface dyslexia are generally used to describe two main types of dyslexia. Phonological dyslexia includes trouble breaking words down into syllables and into smaller sound units called phonemes, while kids with surface dyslexia struggle with reading because they can’t recognize words by sight.

Read more...

A Multiple Cognitive Deficit Model of Developmental Dyslexia

A multiple cognitive deficit model considers all the aspects that may contribute to dyslexia: focused, sustained, divided and visual spatial attention; visual, auditory and phonological processing; rapid naming and processing speed; verbal, visual, auditory, sequential, iconic, short-term, long-term and working memory; logical reasoning; etc.

Read more...

Defeating Dyslexia and Dysgraphia: A Live Case Study

Ten-year-old Dalton has been diagnosed with dyslexia and developmental coordination disorder (dyspraxia) at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, and with dyslexia and dysgraphia by a multidisciplinary team at his school. Despite occupational therapy, speech therapy, physical therapy and putting three Orton-Gillingham-based programs to the test, he continued to struggle.

Read more...

History of Dyslexia: James Hinshelwood

In 1907, a schoolmaster in Glasgow, Scotland, mentioned to a county Medical Officer of Health that he was “greatly puzzled” about four of his students. They were the youngest brothers in a family of eleven children and, unlike their seven siblings, had “experienced the greatest difficulties in learning to read.” The medical officer, a former pupil of James Hinshelwood...

Read more...

What Is Dysphonetic Dyslexia?

Reading difficulties related to auditory-processing weaknesses have been called dysphonetic dyslexia, phonological dyslexia or auditory dyslexia. Children with dysphonetic dyslexia have difficulty remembering letter sounds, analyzing the individual sounds in words, and blending sounds into words.

Read more...

Dyseidetic Dyslexia: Symptoms, Causes, Intervention

Reading difficulties related to visual-processing weaknesses have been called dyseidetic dyslexia, visual dyslexia, orthographic dyslexia or surface dyslexia. The primary deficit of dyseidetic dyslexia is the inability to revisualize the gestalt of the word.

Read more...

17 Facts About Dyslexia

Where does the term dyslexia come from? How common is the problem? Is dyslexia tied to IQ? Does the dyslexic’s brain differ from the normal reader’s brain? Was Albert Einstein dyslexic?

Read more...