Articles

Study: Special Font for People with Dyslexia: Does it Work and, If so, Why?

It would be revolutionary if the reading performance of children and adults with dyslexia could be improved by using a special font. This is exactly what a Dutch graphic designer, Christian Boer, aimed to do when he developed the font “Dyslexie” in 2008.

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Visual Dyslexia: Symptoms, Causes and Intervention

Visual dyslexia, also called surface dyslexia, dyseidetic dyslexia or orthographic dyslexia, is a subtype of dyslexia that refers to children who struggle with reading because they have problems remembering and discriminating visual gestalts.

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Auditory Dyslexia: Characteristics, Causes and Treatment

Auditory dyslexia is also called dysphonetic dyslexia or phonological dyslexia. Generally speaking, the auditory dyslexic tends to perform poorly in several language-related functions. 

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5 Facts About Dyslexia You Haven’t Heard a Thousand Times Before

October was Dyslexia Awareness Month, and many educational providers shared helpful and relevant information on this common problem (including Edublox!). We take a look at a few lesser known facts about dyslexia to add to the wealth of knowledge available on the subject.

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Finding Debunks Theory About the Cerebellum’s Role in Reading and Dyslexia

The cerebellum, a brain structure traditionally considered to be involved in motor function, has been implicated in the reading disability and developmental dyslexia. New research shows that the cerebellum is not engaged during reading in typical readers and does not differ in children who have dyslexia.

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Fact of Fiction? Letter Reversals or Mirror Writing Are the Main Sign of Dyslexia

When learning to read, children may mistake certain letters for other similar ones, especially those that can be reversed or appear the same when seen in a mirror. The child may read “dog” as “bog” or look at the written word “was” and read it as “saw”.

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Fact of Fiction? Dyslexia Is Caused by a Phonological Deficit

Since the beginning of the twentieth century, dyslexia research has been dominated by a search for the Holy Grail: the single cognitive deficit that is necessary and sufficient to cause all behavioral characteristics of dyslexia. Until the 1950s, the belief was that dyslexia is attributable to visual processing problems.

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Fact or Fiction? Dyslexia Is a Myth

Extreme viewpoints exist about dyslexia, which makes it difficult for parents to know how to best help their child. On the one side there is the group who believe dyslexia is a condition that cannot be cured but endured. On the other extreme there are those who say diagnoses of dyslexia are a complete waste of time — and even that dyslexia is a myth.

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Speech Recognition Technology Is Not a Solution for Poor Readers

Could artificial intelligence be a solution for people who cannot read well (functional illiterates) or those who cannot read at all (complete illiterates)? According to psycholinguists, speech technology should never replace learning how to read. Researchers argue that literacy leads to a better understanding of speech because good readers are good at predicting words. Even […]

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Case Study: Overcoming Severe Dyslexia, Dyscalculia and Low IQ

Meet Maddie, a 10-year-old who had been diagnosed with severe dyslexia, moderate dyscalculia, ADHD, and low IQ (low 80s). People who had evaluated her said that they had never seen dyslexia as severe as this before. Her parents had been told by more than one professional that Maddie would probably never read, and that they should try to find things that Maddie could be successful with outside of academics, because she would never be successful in academics...

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A Brief History of Dyslexia: From Berlin to Orton

The term dyslexia was introduced in 1884 by the German ophthalmologist, Rudolf Berlin, in “Over dyslexie.” He coined it from the Greek words "dys" meaning ill or difficult and "lexis" meaning word, and used it to describe a specific disturbance of reading in the absence of pathological conditions in the visual organs.

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Dyslexia: More than a Phonological Deficit

Most problems can only be solved if one knows what causes that particular problem. A disease such as scurvy claimed the lives of thousands of seamen during long sea voyages. The disease was cured fairly quickly once the cause was discovered, viz. a vitamin C deficiency. A viable point of departure would therefore be to ask the question, what causes dyslexia?

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