Articles

A Week in Darkness Rewires Brain Cell Networks, Changes Hearing in Adult Mice

New research reveals how a week in the dark rewires brain cell networks and changes hearing sensitivity in adult mice long after the optimal window for auditory learning has passed. With further study, cross-modal learning -- the manipulation of one sense to induce change in another sense -- could be used to help people with disabilities.

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Screen Time Damages Brains of Kids Under 6, Affecting Language and Reading

Too much time glued to a screen could damage your kids' brains, doctors have warned. A new study reveals more than an hour a day on tablets, smartphones and TV can cause speech, thinking and reading problems in children under six.

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Learning Is Optimized When We Fail 15% of the Time

To learn new things, we must sometimes fail. If you're always scoring 100%, you're probably not learning anything new. But what's the right amount of failure? Research found that the 'sweet spot' for learning is 85%.

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People Who Are Illiterate May Be Three Times As Likely To Develop Dementia

New research has found that people who are illiterate, meaning they never learned to read or write, may have nearly three times greater risk of developing dementia than people who can read and write.

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Adolescents with High Levels of Physical Activity Perform Better in School

Adolescents with higher levels of physical activity performed better in school during transition from primary school to lower secondary school than their physically inactive peers, a new study from Finland shows.

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Study: Reading to Children as Babies Gives Literary Skills a Long-lasting Boost

Parents who read with their children when they are still babies can give a boost to their vocabulary and reading skills that lasts for years to come. Research shows that reading books with a child beginning in early infancy can boost vocabulary and reading skills four years later, before the start of elementary school.

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A Learning Principle of Great Importance: Building a “Pyramid of Repetition”

There is most probably not a single person on this earth who learned to speak a language, learned to swim, skate, play golf, shift gears of a car — or read and write — without repetition. Repetition leads to fast, effortless, autonomous and automatic processing...

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Good Home Learning In Early Years Boosts Secondary School Achievements

The positive effects of a rich home learning environment during a child's early years continue into adolescence and help improve test scores later in life, according to a new study.

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Belief in Learning Styles Myth May Be Detrimental

Many people, including educators, believe learning styles are set at birth and predict both academic and career success even though there is no scientific evidence to support this common myth, according to new research.

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The Brain’s Auto-complete Function. New Insights into Associative Memory

When looking at a picture of a sunny day at the beach, we can almost smell the scent of sun screen. Our brain often completes memories and automatically brings back to mind the different elements of the original experience. A new study now reveals the underlying mechanisms of this auto-complete function.

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Story Time With an E-Book Changes How Parents and Toddlers Interact

Picking what book to read isn’t the only choice families now make at story time — they must also decide between the print or electronic version. But traditional print books may have an edge over e-books when it comes to quality time shared between parents and their children, a new study suggests. The research, led […]

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Academic Achievement Impacts: Parental Involvement, Styles, Income, Media

Parents and researchers alike are interested in how to promote children’s academic competence. Academic achievement has been linked to many factors. In this article we discuss parental involvement, parenting styles, family income, as well as media and digital exposure. 

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