Articles

Inability to Recognize Faces Linked to Broader Visual Recognition Problems

Imagine that you're supposed to meet colleagues for dinner, only you can't remember what their faces look like. For some, this is a reality, as people with face blindness or developmental prosopagnosia (DP) have severe difficulties recognizing faces, including those of family and friends, despite having no history of brain damage (e.g., brain trauma, head injuries). A new study finds that developmental prosopagnosia often occurs as a result of a neurobiological problem in the brain, which affects visual recognition broadly.

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The Secret to Honing Kids’ Language and Literacy

Researchers found that a child's ability to self-regulate is a critical element in childhood language and literacy development, and that the earlier they can hone these skills, the faster language and literacy skills develop leading to better skills in the long run.

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Scientists Pinpoint Neural Interactions that Help Us Learn by Watching Others

It's often said that experience is the best teacher, but the experiences of other people may be even better. This kind of learning, known as observational learning, offers a major advantage.

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Study Explores Link between Curiosity and School Achievement

Researchers know that certain factors give children a leg up when it comes to school performance. Family income, access to early childhood programs and home environment rank high on the list. Now, researchers are looking at another potentially advantageous element: curiosity.

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A Letter We’ve Seen Millions of Times, Yet Can’t Write

Despite seeing it millions of times in pretty much every picture book, every novel, every newspaper and every email message, people are essentially unaware of the more common version of the lowercase print letter 'g,' Johns Hopkins researchers have found.

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Want to Listen Better? Listen with Your Right Ear

Listening requires sensitive hearing and the ability to process information into cohesive meaning. Add everyday background noise and constant interruptions, and the ability to comprehend what is heard becomes that much more difficult. Audiology researchers have found that in such demanding environments, both children and adults depend more on their right ear for processing and retaining what they hear.

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Who’s Smarter in the Classroom — Men or Women?

If you believe it, you can achieve it. You've probably heard this motivational phrase more than once. But what if your beliefs about your own intelligence compared to others come down to your gender?

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Poor Grades Tied to Class Times that Don’t Match our Biological Clocks

It may be time to tailor students' class schedules to their natural biological rhythms. A study shows that students whose circadian rhythms were out of sync with their class schedules received lower grades due to 'social jet lag,' a condition in which peak alertness times are at odds with work, school or other demands.

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Aggression and Weak Study Skills Linked to High School Dropout Rates

Many school systems struggle with a high number of students who do not finish high school. The factors that may lead to a student's decision to leave school are complex, but a new study sheds light on how two behaviors -- aggression and weak study skills -- contribute to the problem.

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China’s Scholastic Success Could Begin with Storybooks, Research Suggests

The lessons from childhood storybooks are decidedly different in China and the United States, and align with the lessons the respective countries impart in the classroom, research finds.

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Reading Between the Lines in Children’s Vocabulary Differences

America's 31 million children growing up in homes with low socio-economic status have, on average, significantly smaller vocabularies compared with their peers. A new study found these differences in vocabulary growth among grade school children of different socioeconomic statuses are likely related to differences in the process of word learning.

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Engaging Children in Math at Home Equals a Boost in More than Just Math Skills

Preschool children who engage in math activities at home with their parents not only improve their math skills, but also their general vocabulary, according to research from Purdue University.

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