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Showing articles with tag: dyslexia-and-the-brain | Clear

Learning Difficulties Due to Poor Connectivity, not Specific Brain Regions

Different learning difficulties do not correspond to specific regions of the brain, as previously thought, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. Instead, poor connectivity between 'hubs' within the brain is much more strongly related to children's difficulties.

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Finding Debunks Theory About the Cerebellum’s Role in Reading and Dyslexia

The cerebellum, a brain structure traditionally considered to be involved in motor function, has been implicated in the reading disability and developmental dyslexia. New research shows that the cerebellum is not engaged during reading in typical readers and does not differ in children who have dyslexia.

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Study: “Resilient” Dyslexics Have More Gray Matter in Prefrontal Cortex

A new joint study identifies the brain mechanism that accounts for the discrepancy between low decoding skills and high reading comprehension in some children with dyslexia.

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Help, My Child Has Dyslexia (Part 2)

Going to school can be a nightmare for children who suffer from dyslexia. The stress and frustration they have to endure as a result of their poor achievement cause them to be reluctant to go to school, develop low self-esteem and have behavioral problems.

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Is Dyslexia a Brain Dysfunction? An Alternative Interpretation of the Facts

Research indicates that the dyslexic’s brain differs from that of a “normal” reader. Does this mean that dyslexia is caused by a neurological dysfunction or is there an alternative interpretation that explains these differences?

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Study: Dyslexics Show a Difference in Sensory Processing

Neuroscientists have discovered that a basic mechanism underlying sensory perception is deficient in individuals with dyslexia. The brain typically adapts rapidly to sensory input, such as the sound of a person's voice or images of faces and objects, as a way to make processing more efficient. But for individuals with dyslexia, the researchers found that adaptation was on average about half that of those without the disorder.

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Distinctive Brain Pattern Found in Dyslexics

A distinctive neural signature found in the brains of people with dyslexia may explain why these individuals have difficulty learning to read, according to a study from MIT neuroscientists.

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What Is Dyslexia Really?

With fMRI-scans et cetera it has now been confirmed that — as was always suspected — there are indeed differences between the brains of dyslexic persons and good readers. More and more research studies, however, suggest that the cause-effect relationship should be reversed, i.e. that these differences might not be the cause, but the effect of the reading difficulty.

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The Brain Is Plastic. And That Is Good News

Your son may be dyslexic, your daughter may have ADHD. Until quite recently these problems were regarded as devastating, but fortunately this is no longer the case. Today we know that the human brain is plastic — that it can change. And that is good news for your children.

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The A2Z of Dyslexia

According to popular belief dyslexia is a neurological disorder in the brain that causes information to be processed and interpreted differently, resulting in reading difficulties. Historically, the dyslexia label has been assigned to learners who are bright, even verbally articulate, but who struggle with reading...

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Dyslexia and Neurological Differences — The Chicken and Egg Dilemma

In the light of neuroplasticity, confirmations of brain differences between the dyslexic and the ‘normal’ reader’s brain call for more research regarding cause and effect. Which of the two is the cause and which one is the effect?

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Less Brain Matter a Consequence, Not Cause of Dyslexia

In people with dyslexia, less gray matter in the brain has been linked to reading disabilities, but now new evidence suggests this is a consequence of poorer reading experiences and not the root cause of the disorder.

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