Articles

The Benefits of Teaching Your Child Two Languages Early in Life

Some parents worry that teaching their children two languages early in life creates word confusion. But it seems there are more benefits than drawbacks to being bilingual as a child. A child carries these benefits into adulthood where it could delay the onset of brain ageing and Alzheimer’s disease.

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Early Reading in Spanish Helps Children Learn to Read English

A study has found that children who had strong early reading skills in their native Spanish language when they entered kindergarten experienced greater growth in their ability to read English from kindergarten through fourth grade. Importantly, when the researchers factored in how well the students spoke English, it turned out that native language reading skills […]

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Learning a New Language: New Insights into How the Brain Functions

When it comes to learning a language, the left side of the brain has traditionally been considered the hub of language processing. But new research shows the right brain plays a critical early role in helping learners identify the basic sounds associated with a language. That could help find new teaching methods to better improve student success in picking up a foreign language.

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New Research Shows Brain’s Right Side Critical for Learning Language

When it comes to learning a language, the left side of the brain has traditionally been considered the hub of language processing. But new research shows the right brain plays a critical early role in helping learners identify the basic sounds associated with a language. That could help find new teaching methods to better improve student success in picking up a foreign language.

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A ‘Million Word Gap’ for Children Who Aren’t Read to at Home

Young children whose parents read them five books a day enter kindergarten having heard about 1.4 million more words than kids who were never read to, a new study found. This 'million word gap' could be one key in explaining differences in vocabulary and reading development.

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Five Ways to Help Your Child’s Language Development

Language development is essential for reading and communication skills later in life. Parents are the main influencers of language in early childhood. This article shares five ways for parents to boost their child’s language development every day.

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Kids Store 1.5 Megabytes of Information to Master their Native Language

Learning one's native language may seem effortless. But new research suggests that language acquisition between birth and 18 is a remarkable feat of cognition, rather than something humans are just hardwired to do.

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Study: Babies Who Hear Two Languages Show Better Attentional Control

The advantages of growing up in a bilingual home can start as early as six months of age, should be considered a significant factor in the early development of attention in infancy, and could set the stage for lifelong cognitive benefits.

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Study: Language Acquisition in Toddlers Improved by Predictable Situations

The first few years of a child's life are crucial for learning language, and though scientists know the "when," the "how" is still up for debate. In a new study, researchers report a factor that is important for language: the predictability of the learning environment.

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Adult-child Conversations Strengthen Language Brain Regions

Young children who are regularly engaged in conversation by adults may have stronger connections between two developing brain regions critical for language, according to a study of healthy young children.

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Learning English as a Second Language

There are many good reasons to learn English as second language. There are more than 6,000 different languages spoken all over the world, but English is and will continue to be a common means of communication for speakers of all languages.

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Importance of Language Development in Low-income, High-risk Children

Researchers who examined child speech interactions over the course of a year found that vulnerable children benefit from conversations with their peers and their teachers.

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