Articles

Diminished Iconic Memory An Early Indicator of Alzheimer’s

The sensory memory for visual stimuli is sometimes known as the iconic memory, the memory for aural stimuli is known as the echoic memory, and that for touch as the haptic memory. In a study on Alzheimer's researchers showed that diminished iconic memory may be an early indicator of an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease.

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Sleeping After Learning New Material Boosts Recall

Nodding off in class may not be such a bad idea after all. Research from the University of Notre Dame shows that going to sleep shortly after learning new material is most beneficial for recall.

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Better-Educated People Recover Better From Brain Injuries

Better-educated people appear to be significantly more likely to recover from a moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), suggesting that a brain's "cognitive reserve" may play a role in helping people get back to their previous lives, new Johns Hopkins research shows.

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From Scaffolding to Screens: Understanding the Developing Brain for Reading

In the debate about nature versus nurture for developing reading skills, cognitive neuroscientists have a clear message: both matter. From infancy, children have a neural scaffolding in place upon which environmental factors refine and build reading skills.

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Scientists Monitor Brains Replaying Memories in Real Time

Researchers monitored the electrical activity of thousands of neurons as patients took memory tests. They found that the firing patterns of the cells that occurred when patients learned a word pair were replayed fractions of a second before they successfully remembered the pair. 

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Use Your Brain, Halve Your Risk of Dementia

Dementia is the loss of mental abilities and most commonly occurs late in life. Research from the School of Psychiatry at UNSW, led by Dr. Michael Valenzuela, showed that people who kept their brains active, for example, through work, leisure activities, or brain training, had half the risk of suffering dementia.

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Rote Learning Improves Memory In Seniors

A study offers older adults a simple way to combat memory loss: memorization. Researchers found that seniors who engaged in an intensive period of rote learning followed by an equally long rest period exhibited improved memory and verbal recall.

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Treatment for Common Vision Disorder Does not Improve Children’s Reading Skills

Results from a clinical trial funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI) show that while vision therapy can successfully treat convergence insufficiency (CI) in children, it fails to improve their reading test scores.

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Learning Difficulties Due to Poor Connectivity, not Specific Brain Regions

Different learning difficulties do not correspond to specific regions of the brain, as previously thought, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. Instead, poor connectivity between 'hubs' within the brain is much more strongly related to children's difficulties.

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Study: Prospective and Retrospective Memory Problems in Adults with Dyslexia

Short-term and working memory problems in dyslexia are well-documented, but other memory domains have received little empirical scrutiny, despite some evidence to suggest that they might be impaired.

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Study: Special Font for People with Dyslexia: Does it Work and, If so, Why?

It would be revolutionary if the reading performance of children and adults with dyslexia could be improved by using a special font. This is exactly what a Dutch graphic designer, Christian Boer, aimed to do when he developed the font “Dyslexie” in 2008.

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A Week in Darkness Rewires Brain Cell Networks, Changes Hearing in Adult Mice

New research reveals how a week in the dark rewires brain cell networks and changes hearing sensitivity in adult mice long after the optimal window for auditory learning has passed. With further study, cross-modal learning -- the manipulation of one sense to induce change in another sense -- could be used to help people with disabilities.

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