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Academic Achievement Impacts: Parental Involvement, Styles, Income, Media

Parents and researchers alike are interested in how to promote children’s academic competence. Academic achievement has been linked to many factors. In this article we discuss parental involvement, parenting styles, family income, as well as media and digital exposure. 

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Rapid Automatized Naming and Dyslexia: What Research Reveals

Rapid automatized naming (RAN) refers to the speed with which the names of symbols (letters, numbers, colors, or pictured objects) can be retrieved from long-term memory. People with dyslexia typically score poorer on RAN assessments than normal readers.

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Special Font for Dyslexia: Does it Work, and Why?

It would be revolutionary if the reading performance of children and adults with dyslexia could be improved by using a special font. This is exactly what a Dutch graphic designer, Christian Boer, aimed to do when he developed the font “Dyslexie” in 2008.

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Learning Is Optimized When We Fail 15% of the Time

To learn new things, we must sometimes fail. If you're always scoring 100%, you're probably not learning anything new. But what's the right amount of failure? Research found that the 'sweet spot' for learning is 85%.

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Simple Raisin Test Forecasts a Child’s Attention and Learning Capacity

A simple test using a raisin can predict how well a toddler will perform academically at age eight, according to research conducted at the University of Warwick.

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Poor Short-term Memory: A Core Deficit in Dyslexia

A study shows that adults with dyslexia present a deficit in core verbal short-term memory processes, a deficit which cannot be accounted for by the language processing difficulties that characterize dyslexia.

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Learning Difficulties Due to Poor Connectivity, not Specific Brain Regions

Different learning difficulties do not correspond to specific regions of the brain, as previously thought, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. Instead, poor connectivity between 'hubs' within the brain is much more strongly related to children's difficulties.

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Thomas Edison Was Not Dyslexic, It Seems

Thomas Edison was an American inventor and businessman who developed many important devices. Edison is considered one of the most prolific inventors of his time, holding 1,093 U.S. patents in his name, as well as many patents in the United Kingdom, France and Germany. He was, apparently, also dyslexic.

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Napping During the Day Improves Brain Skills

According to research, it’s a good idea to take a brief nap during the day. Not only will you feel more refreshed, but a little siesta could help boost brain power and sharpen memory skills.

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Our Ability to Focus May Falter After Eating One Meal High in Saturated Fat

Fatty food may feel like a friend during troubled times, but new research suggests that eating just one meal high in saturated fat can hinder our ability to concentrate.

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A Learning Principle of Great Importance: Building a “Pyramid of Repetition”

There is most probably not a single person on this earth who learned to speak a language, learned to swim, skate, play golf, shift gears of a car — or read and write — without repetition. Repetition leads to fast, effortless, autonomous and automatic processing...

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Study: Time Parents Spend with Children Key to Academic Success

The time parents spend with their children has a powerful effect on their educational achievement, according to a large study with a novel approach. Researchers analyzed data on children in Israel who lost a parent through death or divorce.

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