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Rapid Automatized Naming and Dyslexia: What Research Reveals

Rapid automatized naming (RAN) refers to the speed with which the names of symbols (letters, numbers, colors, or pictured objects) can be retrieved from long-term memory. People with dyslexia typically score poorer on RAN assessments than normal readers.

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Special Font for Dyslexia: Does it Work, and Why?

It would be revolutionary if the reading performance of children and adults with dyslexia could be improved by using a special font. This is exactly what a Dutch graphic designer, Christian Boer, aimed to do when he developed the font “Dyslexie” in 2008.

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A Learning Principle of Great Importance: Building a “Pyramid of Repetition”

There is most probably not a single person on this earth who learned to speak a language, learned to swim, skate, play golf, shift gears of a car — or read and write — without repetition. Repetition leads to fast, effortless, autonomous and automatic processing...

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COVID-19 Virus Enters the Brain, Research Strongly Suggests

More and more evidence is coming out that people with COVID-19 are suffering from cognitive effects, such as brain fog and fatigue. And researchers are discovering why.

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Brain’s Visual Dictionary: More Info Unlocked

Scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have identified a crucial region in the temporal lobe, know as the mid-fusiform cortex, which appears to act as the brain's visual dictionary.

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Humans Are Born with Brains ‘Prewired’ to See Words

Humans are born with a part of the brain that is prewired to be receptive to seeing words and letters, setting the stage at birth for people to learn how to read, a new study suggests. Analyzing brain scans of newborns, researchers found that this part of the brain -- called the 'visual word form area' (VWFA) -- is connected to the language network of the brain.

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Can Sleep Protect Us From Forgetting Old Memories?

From lowering your risk of obesity and cardiovascular disease to improving your concentration and overall daily performance, sleep has been proven to play a critical role in our health. In a new study, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that sleep may also help people to learn continuously through their lifetime.

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Diminished Iconic Memory An Early Indicator of Alzheimer’s

The sensory memory for visual stimuli is sometimes known as the iconic memory, the memory for aural stimuli is known as the echoic memory, and that for touch as the haptic memory. In a study on Alzheimer's researchers showed that diminished iconic memory may be an early indicator of an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease.

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Sleeping After Learning New Material Boosts Recall

Nodding off in class may not be such a bad idea after all. Research from the University of Notre Dame shows that going to sleep shortly after learning new material is most beneficial for recall.

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Better-Educated People Recover Better From Brain Injuries

Better-educated people appear to be significantly more likely to recover from a moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), suggesting that a brain's "cognitive reserve" may play a role in helping people get back to their previous lives, new Johns Hopkins research shows.

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From Scaffolding to Screens: Understanding the Developing Brain for Reading

In the debate about nature versus nurture for developing reading skills, cognitive neuroscientists have a clear message: both matter. From infancy, children have a neural scaffolding in place upon which environmental factors refine and build reading skills.

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Scientists Monitor Brains Replaying Memories in Real Time

Researchers monitored the electrical activity of thousands of neurons as patients took memory tests. They found that the firing patterns of the cells that occurred when patients learned a word pair were replayed fractions of a second before they successfully remembered the pair. 

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