Articles

From Scaffolding to Screens: Understanding the Developing Brain for Reading

In the debate about nature versus nurture for developing reading skills, cognitive neuroscientists have a clear message: both matter. From infancy, children have a neural scaffolding in place upon which environmental factors refine and build reading skills.

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Scientists Monitor Brains Replaying Memories in Real Time

Researchers monitored the electrical activity of thousands of neurons as patients took memory tests. They found that the firing patterns of the cells that occurred when patients learned a word pair were replayed fractions of a second before they successfully remembered the pair. 

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Treatment for Common Vision Disorder Does not Improve Children’s Reading Skills

Results from a clinical trial funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI) show that while vision therapy can successfully treat convergence insufficiency (CI) in children, it fails to improve their reading test scores.

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Learning Difficulties Due to Poor Connectivity, not Specific Brain Regions

Different learning difficulties do not correspond to specific regions of the brain, as previously thought, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. Instead, poor connectivity between 'hubs' within the brain is much more strongly related to children's difficulties.

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Study: Prospective and Retrospective Memory Problems in Adults with Dyslexia

Short-term and working memory problems in dyslexia are well-documented, but other memory domains have received little empirical scrutiny, despite some evidence to suggest that they might be impaired.

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Study: Special Font for People with Dyslexia: Does it Work and, If so, Why?

It would be revolutionary if the reading performance of children and adults with dyslexia could be improved by using a special font. This is exactly what a Dutch graphic designer, Christian Boer, aimed to do when he developed the font “Dyslexie” in 2008.

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A Week in Darkness Rewires Brain Cell Networks, Changes Hearing in Adult Mice

New research reveals how a week in the dark rewires brain cell networks and changes hearing sensitivity in adult mice long after the optimal window for auditory learning has passed. With further study, cross-modal learning -- the manipulation of one sense to induce change in another sense -- could be used to help people with disabilities.

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Screen Time Damages Brains of Kids Under 6, Affecting Language and Reading

Too much time glued to a screen could damage your kids' brains, doctors have warned. A new study reveals more than an hour a day on tablets, smartphones and TV can cause speech, thinking and reading problems in children under six.

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Learning Is Optimized When We Fail 15% of the Time

To learn new things, we must sometimes fail. If you're always scoring 100%, you're probably not learning anything new. But what's the right amount of failure? Research found that the 'sweet spot' for learning is 85%.

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People Who Are Illiterate May Be Three Times As Likely To Develop Dementia

New research has found that people who are illiterate, meaning they never learned to read or write, may have nearly three times greater risk of developing dementia than people who can read and write.

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Adolescents with High Levels of Physical Activity Perform Better in School

Adolescents with higher levels of physical activity performed better in school during transition from primary school to lower secondary school than their physically inactive peers, a new study from Finland shows.

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Study: Reading to Children as Babies Gives Literary Skills a Long-lasting Boost

Parents who read with their children when they are still babies can give a boost to their vocabulary and reading skills that lasts for years to come. Research shows that reading books with a child beginning in early infancy can boost vocabulary and reading skills four years later, before the start of elementary school.

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