Articles

Ask Susan: Why a Multiple Cognitive Approach Is the Answer to Learning Disabilities

Susan provides four reasons why the best solution for learning disabilities is to follow a balanced and holistic approach and develop multiple cognitive skills, and not only some.

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Building Solid Foundational Skills

Foundational skills are the basic skills that need to be taught and developed first and foremost. These skills are the foundations that hold our learning ability together.

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Facts about Visual Memory

Visual memory involves the ability to store and retrieve previously experienced visual sensations and perceptions when the stimuli that originally evoked them are no longer present. That is, the person must be capable of making a vivid visual image in his mind of the stimulus, such as a word, and once that stimulus is removed, to be able to visualize or recall this image without help.

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Understanding Visual Perceptual Skills and Visual Perceptual Deficits

The terms visual perceptual skills and visual processing skills are often used interchangeably, and refer to the skills that a person uses to make sense of what they see. Recognizing letters and numbers, matching shapes, recognizing a face, finding a toy in a messy cupboard, reading a road sign – these are all examples of how visual perception is used in everyday life.

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How Perception Is Determined by Attention

The process of perception is very much affected by attention, a phenomenon that involves filtering of incoming stimuli. Human beings do not pay attention to everything in their environments; nor do they attend to all the stimuli impinging on their sense organs. Rather than becoming overwhelmed by the enormous complexity of the physical world, we attend to some stimuli and do not notice others.

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Going for a Run Could Improve Cramming for Exams

Ever worried that all the information you've crammed in during a study session might not stay in your memory? The answer might be going for a run, according to a study published in Cognitive Systems Research.

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Why Working Memory Matters for Students

Working memory is like a mental jotting pad and how good this is in someone will either ease their path to learning or seriously prevent them from learning.

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Long-term Memory: From Encoding to Retrieval

Long-term memory involves three stages -- encoding, storage and retrieval (getting information in, keeping it there and then getting it back out) -- and appears to contain several different kinds: episodic, semantic, declarative and procedural. 

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Smart Kids Have Logic Skills

Logical thinking or logical reasoning is the process of using a rational, systematic series of steps based on sound mathematical procedures and given statements to arrive at a conclusion. Unfortunately its role in learning is grossly underestimated, and its role in overcoming learning difficulties is neglected.

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Visual Memory: Definition, Types and Importance for Academic Achievement

Visual memory is the ability to remember or recall information such as faces, pictures or words that have been viewed in the past. Researchers have subdivided visual memory into three main subsystems: visual sensory memory, visual short-term memory, and visual long-term memory.

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Three Cognitive Skills that Matter for Academic Achievement

This paper was presented virtually at the EduLearn19 International Conference on New Learning Technologies in Palma, Spain. The study confirms the importance of strong cognitive skills for academic achievement; the cognitive skill with the strongest correlation was auditory short-term memory.

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Learning Multiple Things Simultaneously Increases Cognitive Abilities

Learning several new things at once increases cognitive abilities in older adults, according to new research. After just 1.5 months learning multiple tasks in a new study, participants increased their cognitive abilities to levels similar to those of middle-aged adults, 30 years younger. Control group members, who did not take classes, showed no change in their performance.

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