Articles

Ask Susan: Orthographic Dyslexia — Symptoms, Causes, Intervention

Orthographic dyslexia, also called surface dyslexia, dyseidetic dyslexia or visual dyslexia, is a subtype of dyslexia that refers to children who struggle with reading because they can’t recognize words by sight.

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Ask Susan: Reading Comprehension Difficulties — Symptoms, Causes, Intervention

Reading comprehension is the heart and goal of reading, since the purpose of all reading is to gather meaning from the printed page. The symptoms and causes of reading comprehension difficulties are discussed, as well as intervention.

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Dyslexia Research VI: Repetition, the Second Cornerstone in Overcoming Dyslexia

Rote, which is the outcome of repetition, means to do something in a routine or fixed way, to respond automatically by memory alone, without thought. Repetition thus leads to fast, effortless, autonomous and automatic processing...

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Dyslexia Research III: Dyslexia Causes

Most problems can only be solved if one knows what causes that particular problem. A viable point of departure would thus be to ask: what causes dyslexia?

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Dyslexia Research II: The History of Dyslexia

Recognition of developmental dyslexia is credited to James Kerr and Pringle Morgan. In an article to The Lancet titled “A case of congenital word blindness,” Morgan (1896) identified a 14-year-old boy called Percy...

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Dyslexia Research I: What Is Dyslexia Really?

Imagine not being able to read. Your qualifications would most likely exclude a twelve grade certificate, seriously limiting your chances for academic and occupational success.

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Study: Prospective and Retrospective Memory Problems in Adults with Dyslexia

Short-term and working memory problems in dyslexia are well-documented, but other memory domains have received little empirical scrutiny, despite some evidence to suggest that they might be impaired.

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Study: Special Font for People with Dyslexia: Does it Work and, If so, Why?

It would be revolutionary if the reading performance of children and adults with dyslexia could be improved by using a special font. This is exactly what a Dutch graphic designer, Christian Boer, aimed to do when he developed the font “Dyslexie” in 2008.

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5 Facts About Dyslexia You Haven’t Heard a Thousand Times Before

October was Dyslexia Awareness Month, and many educational providers shared helpful and relevant information on this common problem (including Edublox!). We take a look at a few lesser known facts about dyslexia to add to the wealth of knowledge available on the subject.

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Finding Debunks Theory About the Cerebellum’s Role in Reading and Dyslexia

The cerebellum, a brain structure traditionally considered to be involved in motor function, has been implicated in the reading disability and developmental dyslexia. New research shows that the cerebellum is not engaged during reading in typical readers and does not differ in children who have dyslexia.

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Fact of Fiction? Letter Reversals or Mirror Writing Are the Main Sign of Dyslexia

When learning to read, children may mistake certain letters for other similar ones, especially those that can be reversed or appear the same when seen in a mirror. The child may read “dog” as “bog” or look at the written word “was” and read it as “saw”.

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Fact of Fiction? Dyslexia Is Caused by a Phonological Deficit

Since the beginning of the twentieth century, dyslexia research has been dominated by a search for the Holy Grail: the single cognitive deficit that is necessary and sufficient to cause all behavioral characteristics of dyslexia. Until the 1950s, the belief was that dyslexia is attributable to visual processing problems.

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