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Language Development: Talk Your Baby Clever

Undoubtedly, language development is one of the key milestones during early childhood development. A significant part of a child’s social and intellectual development hinges on reaching this milestone.

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Six Stages of Language Development

Most parents can hardly wait for their baby to say its first word. This usually happens between nine months and a year. From about two years, the child should be able to use simple phrases, and by three he should be able to use full sentences.

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Learning a New Language: New Insights into How the Brain Functions

When it comes to learning a language, the left side of the brain has traditionally been considered the hub of language processing. But new research shows the right brain plays a critical early role in helping learners identify the basic sounds associated with a language. That could help find new teaching methods to better improve student success in picking up a foreign language.

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New Research Shows Brain’s Right Side Critical for Learning Language

When it comes to learning a language, the left side of the brain has traditionally been considered the hub of language processing. But new research shows the right brain plays a critical early role in helping learners identify the basic sounds associated with a language. That could help find new teaching methods to better improve student success in picking up a foreign language.

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Five Ways to Help Your Child’s Language Development

Language development is essential for reading and communication skills later in life. Parents are the main influencers of language in early childhood. This article shares five ways for parents to boost their child’s language development every day.

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Learning English as a Second Language

There are many good reasons to learn English as second language. There are more than 6,000 different languages spoken all over the world, but English is and will continue to be a common means of communication for speakers of all languages.

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Importance of Language Development in Low-income, High-risk Children

Researchers who examined child speech interactions over the course of a year found that vulnerable children benefit from conversations with their peers and their teachers.

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Music Lessons Improve Language Skills; not IQ, Attention, Memory

Many studies have shown that musical training can enhance language skills. However, it was unknown whether music lessons improve general cognitive ability, leading to better language proficiency, or if the effect of music is more specific to language processing.

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Want Your Child to Succeed in School? Add Language to the Math, Reading Mix

Research shows that the more skills children bring with them to kindergarten, the more likely they will succeed in those same areas in school. Now it's time to add language to that mix of skills. Not only does a child's use of vocabulary and grammar predict future proficiency with the spoken and written word, but it also affects performance in other subject areas.

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Babies Who Suffered Stroke Regain Language Function in Opposite Side of Brain

A stroke in a baby -- even a big one -- does not have the same lasting impact as a stroke in an adult. A study found that a decade or two after a 'perinatal' stroke damaged the left 'language' side of the brain, affected teenagers and young adults used the right sides of their brain for language.

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4 Reasons Your Child Should Learn a Second Language

Raising a bilingual child is an endeavor more parents should pursue. Instead of only focusing on your child's social interaction and comprehension skills, consider teaching your child to learn new words and phrases in a secondary language too.

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If Your Child Is Bilingual, Learning Additional Languages Later Might Be Easier

It is often claimed that people who are bilingual are better than monolinguals at learning languages. Now, the first study to examine bilingual and monolingual brains as they learn an additional language offers new evidence that supports this hypothesis, researchers say.

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