Articles

What Are the Different Types of Dyslexia?

The terms phonological dyslexia and surface dyslexia are generally used to describe two main types of dyslexia. Phonological dyslexia includes trouble breaking words down into syllables and into smaller sound units called phonemes, while kids with surface dyslexia struggle with reading because they can’t recognize words by sight.

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A Multiple Cognitive Deficit Model of Developmental Dyslexia

A multiple cognitive deficit model considers all the aspects that may contribute to dyslexia: focused, sustained, divided and visual spatial attention; visual, auditory and phonological processing; rapid naming and processing speed; verbal, visual, auditory, sequential, iconic, short-term, long-term and working memory; logical reasoning; etc.

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Defeating Dyslexia and Dysgraphia: A Live Case Study

Ten-year-old Dalton has been diagnosed with dyslexia and developmental coordination disorder (dyspraxia) at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, and with dyslexia and dysgraphia by a multidisciplinary team at his school. Despite occupational therapy, speech therapy, physical therapy and putting three Orton-Gillingham-based programs to the test, he continued to struggle.

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History of Dyslexia: James Hinshelwood

In 1907, a schoolmaster in Glasgow, Scotland, mentioned to a county Medical Officer of Health that he was “greatly puzzled” about four of his students. They were the youngest brothers in a family of eleven children and, unlike their seven siblings, had “experienced the greatest difficulties in learning to read.” The medical officer, a former pupil of James Hinshelwood...

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What Is Dysphonetic Dyslexia?

Reading difficulties related to auditory-processing weaknesses have been called dysphonetic dyslexia, phonological dyslexia or auditory dyslexia. Children with dysphonetic dyslexia have difficulty remembering letter sounds, analyzing the individual sounds in words, and blending sounds into words.

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Dyseidetic Dyslexia: Symptoms, Causes, Intervention

Reading difficulties related to visual-processing weaknesses have been called dyseidetic dyslexia, visual dyslexia, orthographic dyslexia or surface dyslexia. The primary deficit of dyseidetic dyslexia is the inability to revisualize the gestalt of the word.

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17 Facts About Dyslexia

Where does the term dyslexia come from? How common is the problem? Is dyslexia tied to IQ? Does the dyslexic’s brain differ from the normal reader’s brain? Was Albert Einstein dyslexic?

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Ask Susan: Is Dyslexia Incurable?

Ever since the diagnosis my son has been depressed and has become withdrawn. He says he is dumb and stupid. He really wants to overcome his problems but we don’t know if that is even possible. The opinion of most people is that dyslexia is incurable. Do you agree?

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Teaching Reading IS Rocket Science

"Contrary to the popular theory that learning to read is natural and easy, learning to read is a complex linguistic achievement," Dr. Louisa Moats writes in her booklet Teaching Reading IS Rocket Science. "For many children, it requires effort and incremental skill development."

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The Emotional Scars of Learning and Reading Disabilities

Persistent learning failure leads to anguish, embarrassment and frustration. Children with learning disabilities experience shame, anxiety, social isolation, sadness or lack of self-confidence on a daily basis, which create and contribute to a negative self-image and low self-esteem.

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Study: “Resilient” Dyslexics Have More Gray Matter in Prefrontal Cortex

A new joint study identifies the brain mechanism that accounts for the discrepancy between low decoding skills and high reading comprehension in some children with dyslexia.

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Parenting a Child with Dyslexia: The Fears, Hopes and Dreams

"If you do not have a child with dyslexia or know anyone who cannot read, you cannot imagine the feelings of hopelessness, disappointment, and desperation to find something, anything that will work. You cannot imagine how limiting it is in the life of a child to be unable to read anything, to be surrounded by the written word and it being forever out of your reach...."

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