Articles

Five Benefits of Regular Family Dinners

Family dinner time is an important part of the day. Not only is it a time to sit down and have a nutritious meal, it also provides family members with the opportunity to connect with each other as they talk about the events of the day. Discover five benefits of regular family dinners, and learn why you should make a family meal part of your daily routine.

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Ask Susan: Orthographic Dyslexia — Symptoms, Causes, Intervention

Orthographic dyslexia, also called surface dyslexia, dyseidetic dyslexia or visual dyslexia, is a subtype of dyslexia that refers to children who struggle with reading because they can’t recognize words by sight.

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Ask Susan: Reading Comprehension Difficulties — Symptoms, Causes, Intervention

Reading comprehension is the heart and goal of reading, since the purpose of all reading is to gather meaning from the printed page. The symptoms and causes of reading comprehension difficulties are discussed, as well as intervention.

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Ask Susan: When Do the Exercises Level Up?

I bought a 3 month membership for my son. I have difficulty understanding why the reading, sequencing and grid pattern graphs are not moving at all, although he is doing the exercises.

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Math Learning Disabilities: Symptoms, Causes and Treatment

Math is an unavoidable and required knowledge. Whether in science, business, or daily living, we cannot escape the use of numbers. Every job, from the rocket scientist to the sheep herder, requires the use of math!

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Processing Deficits and Math Performance

Making comparisons of likeness and difference is nearly impossible for the person with processing deficits, and for this reason processing deficits frequently impact not only performance in reading, but in math as well.

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Ask Susan: Strategies to Improve Inferential Comprehension

Inferential comprehension is the ability to process written information and understand the underlying meaning of the text. This information is then used to infer or determine deeper meaning that is not explicitly stated. It is a higher order thinking skill that involves linking prior knowledge to new information to make meaning; and requires readers to combine ideas, draw conclusions, as well as interpret and evaluate information.

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Ask Susan: Cognitive Skills Training Can Be Compared to Weightlifting

Image going to the gym, where you will be doing weightlifting for the first time. There will be weight plates of different sizes: from the lightest weighing 2.5 pounds, to the heaviest weighing 100 pounds. Every person in the gym, including you, will be lifting weights according to their own abilities, with the ultimate aim of lifting heavier and heavier weights to build body muscles.

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Ask Susan: Should One Focus on Weaker Cognitive Skills?

Just wondering, does the program allow the child to focus more on areas they struggle with, rather than work on all areas equally?

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Dyscalculia: Statistics and Characteristics

Dyscalculia, which means inability to calculate, is the most widely used term for disabilities in arithmetic and mathematics. Sometimes the term acalculia is used to refer to complete inability to use mathematical symbols and the term dyscalculia is reserved for less severe problems in these areas.

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Ask Susan: Why a Multiple Cognitive Approach Is the Answer to Learning Disabilities

Susan provides four reasons why the best solution for learning disabilities is to follow a balanced and holistic approach and develop multiple cognitive skills, and not only some.

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Dyslexia Research VI: Repetition, the Second Cornerstone in Overcoming Dyslexia

Rote, which is the outcome of repetition, means to do something in a routine or fixed way, to respond automatically by memory alone, without thought. Repetition thus leads to fast, effortless, autonomous and automatic processing...

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