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Showing articles with tag: visual-word-form-area | Clear

Humans Are Born with Brains ‘Prewired’ to See Words

Humans are born with a part of the brain that is prewired to be receptive to seeing words and letters, setting the stage at birth for people to learn how to read, a new study suggests. Analyzing brain scans of newborns, researchers found that this part of the brain -- called the 'visual word form area' (VWFA) -- is connected to the language network of the brain.

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Study Sheds Light On How Words Are Represented In the Brain

Reading is a relatively modern and uniquely human skill. For this reason, visual word recognition has been a puzzle for neuroscientists. In recent years, much of this debate has centered on the left mid-fusiform gyrus, which some call the visual word form area. A recent study addresses this debate and sheds light on our understanding of the neurobiology of reading.

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After Learning New Words, Brain Sees Them As Pictures

When we look at a known word, our brain sees it like a picture, not a group of letters needing to be processed. That's the finding from a Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, which shows the brain learns words quickly by tuning neurons to respond to a complete word, not parts of it.

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Brain’s ‘Visual Dictionary’ Helps Skilled Readers to Identify Words Faster

Skilled readers can recognize words at lightning fast speed when they read because the word has been placed in a sort of visual dictionary, say Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC) neuroscientists. The visual dictionary idea rebuts the theory that our brain “sounds out” words each time we see them.

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