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Why Working Memory Matters for Students

Working memory is like a mental jotting pad and how good this is in someone will either ease their path to learning or seriously prevent them from learning.

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Cognitive Skills: What They Are and Why They Are Important

The word “cognition” is defined as “the act or process of knowing”. Cognitive skills therefore refer to those skills that make it possible for us to know. They have more to do with the mechanisms of how we learn, rather than with any actual knowledge. Cognitive skills include perception, attention, memory and logical reasoning.

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Research on Auditory Memory: The Overlooked Learning Skill Deficiency

Sixty-four Grade 2 students were randomly divided into three groups: the first group completed 28 hours of Edublox's Development Tutor over three weeks; a second group was exposed to standard computer games, while a third group continued with schoolwork...

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Types of Memory: Visual, Auditory, Sensory, Working, Short- & Long-term

Scientists now know that memory actually takes many different forms. Memory is not an “all-or-none” process; it is clear that there are actually many kinds of memory, each of which may be somewhat independent of the others. Here are a few...

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Short-Term Memory: Definition, Facts, Studies, Test, Overcoming Deficits

If you have looked up a telephone number in a directory, you already know a great deal about short-term memory. You repeat the number to yourself until you dial, and then you forget it. If the number is busy, you may have to look it up again.

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Sequential Memory: Definition, Importance, Overcoming Deficits

Sequential memory requires items to be recalled in a specific order. In saying the days of the week, months of the year, a telephone number, the alphabet, and in counting, the order of the elements is of paramount importance.

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Understanding Short-Term Memory

Short-term memory lasts from a few seconds to a minute or so, and can be compared to the control tower of a major airport, responsible for scheduling and coordinating all incoming and outgoing flights. You need this kind of memory to retain ideas and thoughts as you work on problems.

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4 Ways to Improve Your Child’s Working Memory

Working memory is increasingly recognized as a crucial cognitive skill and by improving our working memory we may be able to realise gains in key areas, from school to work to retirement. Here are a few ways to improve your child's (or you own) working memory.

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Neuroscientists Identify Brain Circuit Necessary for Memory Formation

When we visit a friend or go to the beach, our brain stores a short-term memory of the experience in a part of the brain called the hippocampus. Those memories are later "consolidated" -- that is, transferred to another part of the brain for longer-term storage.

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Cognitive Foundations of Learning

Learning is like building a house. The first step is to lay a foundation. Unless there is a strong and solid foundation, cracks will soon appear in the walls, and with no foundations, the walls will collapse. In the same way one needs to lay a proper foundation before it becomes possible for a child to benefit from a course in reading, writing and arithmetic. If this foundation is shaky, learning “cracks” will soon appear.

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Memory Techniques Not the Answer to Memory Challenges

“Children, it's almost time to go home. Please write down your homework, put your books away, and line up at the door.” Sounds simple and straight forward… So why is John already lined up at the door when his books are all over his desk? And where are the materials he needs to take home to do his homework?

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Long-Term Memory: What It Is and Tips to Improve It

Long-term memory is the relatively permanent memory storage system that holds information indefinitely. In it we store last year’s Currie Cup score, the image of an elephant, and how to ride a bicycle. We also appear to be storing information that we can’t consciously retrieve, but which still affects our behavior.

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